Tag Archives: design

How to Make Hooks or Hangers From Soda Bottles

8 Jun

After the complete tedium of the no go fabric/ plastic rugs, I needed a quick and easy for my soul to regain the feeling of accomplishment and control.

I had been saving plastic bottles for another project I had in mind, but since we have a collection center for plastic bottles near by, and they really are easy to come by in largish quantities, I decided to sacrifice 6 of them for my quick and easy.

 The concept is  the same as with my tuna can hooks  except it is even faster and easier to do, and it has the added advantage of permanently removing some of the never-played-with little knick-knacks off the ever growing pile of toys on the floor.  No doubt and all around win-win situation.

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 Making them is very easy. Just cut of the top of the bottle, leaving at least 2 inches and a tab you can use to hang it from, with a screw or nail, (depending what you will be using them for), Collect all the knick- knacks you need and go wild.

 A few points to ponder:

 Design wise the sky is the limit.

Because of the star shaped bottom most soda bottles have, it is a bit hard to see the details of the design face on. Make sure the sides look good too.

The deeper you make it, the easier it will be to hang stuff on it. As opposed to the tuna cans, the edges on the bottles are curved, so for some things to hang well and not slip off you might need some depth.

I don’t expect these to last as long as the tuna can hooks. Plastic is softer and weaker and it will probably break if abused to much.

I don’t think that that is necessarily a bad thing when it comes to décor in kids rooms.

Anyway, the kids love them, and I love the fact that they were quick and easy, with both a start and a finish.

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How To Make a Coat Rack from Tin Cans

15 Jan

I finished them, or kind of did LOL.

Tin can coat hooks

It was quick, light and fun as anticipated, and I would have been able to say that I finished them completely if I was happy with the colors, and had the hardware for the wall… (I don’t know what it’s called in English, neither does Google translator….the little plastic thing you insert into the hole in the wall, into which you can screw a screw….)

BTW, the reason they have light canvas totes hanging from them instead of heavy leather coats is because they are secured to the wall with blue tac at this point in time. It was quite amusing trying to get the bags to stay up long enough for me to walk the 2 steps back to photograph them….

I wanted them to be gradated shades of light blue or light blue/gray. Color is not something I do often so getting the colors to look exactly like I wanted them, with the subtle differences you would see on paint chips has proved harder than I expected. Being disappointed with the blues I thought that it would be more subtle in shades of cream….Not quite sure yet.

Anyway, the good thing is that Tuna cans are not hard to come by, and this isn’t a time consuming project which means I can be as indecisive as I want to….!

Of course you can treat these as a blank canvas, dolling them up or keeping them as plain as you want. I love the clean industrial look the bottom of the cans have, which is why I decided only to use color.

I have put together a short tutorial for your benefit:

You will need:

Tuna can/cans

Metal snipers,

Drill or nail (to be used as a punch) and hammer

Flat nose pliers, preferably toothless so you don’t scar the metal

Primer

Paint

Polyurethane to finish.

Drill 2 holes right near to the bottom of the can, about 1.5 – 2 cm apart. (more or less o.6 – o.85 inches)

Starter holes In Tin Can

Cut with metal snips between the two holes and then down to the bottom of the can. It helps to mark the lines before hand, since you snips will pull you sideways.

preparting tab

Pull the tongue out towards you and fold the edges towards the inner side. (I like the fold to be visible. If you would like the fold to be invisible, then fold the edges towards the outside of the can).

Push the tongue inwards till it is perpendicular to the can and fold the edges on the can itself inwards. The folding makes things look a bit tidier, and also helps you avoid cutting yourself or ripping your coats. This is a bit more complicated to do since you need to find a way to grab the edges of the can with your pliers from the inside…It is doable with a bit of patients.

Finish folding the tongue so that when placed on the table, the opening of the can and the tongue are flat.

Drill a hole in the tongue big enough for a screw.

Paint with primer and get creative with paints. It’s a good Idea to finish it off with poly since coats and bags might be rough on the paint and vs. versa.

Enjoy!

Whoohoo….

12 Jan

Remember my List?

Combine that with the fact that on the same day I wrote the list my coat hanger rack, or one of them, magically fell of the wall in the laundry room. It kind of felt as if the powers that be were trying to give me a big fat hint as to what item on my list would be a good place to start……

 mystery hook

This coat spent the whole night hanging on my new trial coat hanger…..it  is just a sketch to see if it would work, and guess what – It does.

 Of course, like the rest of the things I am making, it will take time before I can actually show you the finished product, all nicely gussied up for guests and for show and tell, and I am wondering if I should leave this as a cliff hanger to get you to check back soon, or if I should go with my instinct an my inability to keep my mouth shut and show you this:

Tadaaa!

I am really excited about this, and have a whole master plan R hasn’t heard of yet…. (Although he did giggle in delight when I showed it to him yesterday) he tends to get stressed by the thought of old cans hung on our walls in plain view…..

‘Nuff said!

8 fantastic recycled design projects in less than one minute each

29 Dec

Every now and then, maybe once a week, maybe less, I will be posting some of the inspiration I find in all sorts of corners on line.I This video had me smiling the whole way through, so I thought I would share it with you.

it would probably take more than 1 minute to make each but who’s counting?
via craftzine