Archive | :List RSS feed for this section

How To Make a Paper Shell Chandelier

14 Feb

fauz capiz shell chandelier

If you have been following me, you know that on my 2012 list of things to make I have several light fittings, since we don’t have any at all in our house. I have started a couple out of paper mache, and have left them for a bit to think about how I want to proceed. I have a few other ideas running around in my head, one of them Is this faux capiz shell chandelier, and chances are the first blog to feature them was Design sponge. These seem remarkable simple to make, so simple its nearly silly, and I marked it in my head as something that would look great in our bedroom.

For the base you can use an old lamp shade or planter basket (which is what I did) and the shells are made of several layers of wax paper, ironed together.

 

I used ovals instead of circles, and initially tried adding some glitter in between the layers of wax paper, but decided to pass on that since it prevented the wax paper from adhering properly.

 Although, as I said before, this is so simple it’s nearly silly, I still managed to get myself into all sorts of trouble, mainly by neglecting to see how far the end of bulb was from the ceiling, only to discover that “not far enough” was a pretty accurate description…. I only found this out while single handedly attempting to hang it from my ceiling. I ended up having to cut out the center of the basket, to allow the bulb to hang through, but now might just have a fire hazard on my hands since it is really close to the paper. I will probably shop for some kind of hardware that will allow the light to sit right on the ceiling, thus avoid burning my house down.

 Other than that, I am quite pleased with it. It softens my bedroom up nicely, and is much nicer to wake up to in the morning than a bare bulb.

 

There are several ways these can be made, and it worth while searching a bit and choosing the way that suits you best.

 This is what I did:

  •  I started of by ironing 4 layers of wax paper together. I sandwiched them in between parchment paper, to keep the iron clean.   (I did this many times, maybe 50)

  • Using a stencil oval cutter, I cut out 1000 ovals (yeah, I know….) out of which I ended up using probably about 950.  To minimize the work, try and see how many pages you can cut through at once. I found that 3 was fine, four was pushing it, so for most of the time I cut in piles of 3 (after it occurred to me that it’s insane to cut each oval on its own).

 

  • A lot of people use hot glue to make the strips of circles/ovals. I am not a glue fan so chose to sew the strips. I made sure to overlap the ovals a bit, except between the two first ovals, where I left a tiny space. When attaching the strip to the basket, I just folded that little space over the basket wire, so that I have one oval on the inner side of the basket. I attaché the thread to the basket wire with a bead of hot glue.

 

  • When you sew or glue your strips together, start by counting out your ovals/circles into groups. I used a muffin tin (two, in fact). It streamlines the work.

 

  • Use the longest stitch on the sewing machine. To avoid tearing the paper.

 

  • Work from the inside out. It’s a good Idea to sew or connect your strips for the first tier, and figure out how long you want the next row to be. My inner circle has 11 ovals on each strip (one folded over), then 2 rows of 8 and one row of 6.
  •  While working on it, I had it suspended between the backs of two chairs.
  •  I attached mine to the ceiling with two small hooks.

Now, other than the chandelier, I have a pile of thick wax paper sandwiches with oval cutouts. I wonder what I can do with them? Any Ideas?

How To Make a Coat Rack from Tin Cans

15 Jan

I finished them, or kind of did LOL.

Tin can coat hooks

It was quick, light and fun as anticipated, and I would have been able to say that I finished them completely if I was happy with the colors, and had the hardware for the wall… (I don’t know what it’s called in English, neither does Google translator….the little plastic thing you insert into the hole in the wall, into which you can screw a screw….)

BTW, the reason they have light canvas totes hanging from them instead of heavy leather coats is because they are secured to the wall with blue tac at this point in time. It was quite amusing trying to get the bags to stay up long enough for me to walk the 2 steps back to photograph them….

I wanted them to be gradated shades of light blue or light blue/gray. Color is not something I do often so getting the colors to look exactly like I wanted them, with the subtle differences you would see on paint chips has proved harder than I expected. Being disappointed with the blues I thought that it would be more subtle in shades of cream….Not quite sure yet.

Anyway, the good thing is that Tuna cans are not hard to come by, and this isn’t a time consuming project which means I can be as indecisive as I want to….!

Of course you can treat these as a blank canvas, dolling them up or keeping them as plain as you want. I love the clean industrial look the bottom of the cans have, which is why I decided only to use color.

I have put together a short tutorial for your benefit:

You will need:

Tuna can/cans

Metal snipers,

Drill or nail (to be used as a punch) and hammer

Flat nose pliers, preferably toothless so you don’t scar the metal

Primer

Paint

Polyurethane to finish.

Drill 2 holes right near to the bottom of the can, about 1.5 – 2 cm apart. (more or less o.6 – o.85 inches)

Starter holes In Tin Can

Cut with metal snips between the two holes and then down to the bottom of the can. It helps to mark the lines before hand, since you snips will pull you sideways.

preparting tab

Pull the tongue out towards you and fold the edges towards the inner side. (I like the fold to be visible. If you would like the fold to be invisible, then fold the edges towards the outside of the can).

Push the tongue inwards till it is perpendicular to the can and fold the edges on the can itself inwards. The folding makes things look a bit tidier, and also helps you avoid cutting yourself or ripping your coats. This is a bit more complicated to do since you need to find a way to grab the edges of the can with your pliers from the inside…It is doable with a bit of patients.

Finish folding the tongue so that when placed on the table, the opening of the can and the tongue are flat.

Drill a hole in the tongue big enough for a screw.

Paint with primer and get creative with paints. It’s a good Idea to finish it off with poly since coats and bags might be rough on the paint and vs. versa.

Enjoy!

Whoohoo….

12 Jan

Remember my List?

Combine that with the fact that on the same day I wrote the list my coat hanger rack, or one of them, magically fell of the wall in the laundry room. It kind of felt as if the powers that be were trying to give me a big fat hint as to what item on my list would be a good place to start……

 mystery hook

This coat spent the whole night hanging on my new trial coat hanger…..it  is just a sketch to see if it would work, and guess what – It does.

 Of course, like the rest of the things I am making, it will take time before I can actually show you the finished product, all nicely gussied up for guests and for show and tell, and I am wondering if I should leave this as a cliff hanger to get you to check back soon, or if I should go with my instinct an my inability to keep my mouth shut and show you this:

Tadaaa!

I am really excited about this, and have a whole master plan R hasn’t heard of yet…. (Although he did giggle in delight when I showed it to him yesterday) he tends to get stressed by the thought of old cans hung on our walls in plain view…..

‘Nuff said!

My 2012 2Do List

9 Jan

photo credit creative commons license Vizzzual.com

I have been busy with this blog and the project behind it for about 6 weeks now, and the passion I started out with has turned into confusion. Confusion is not the most accurate word for what I am feeling. Lost is more like it. Things are taking such a long time. Techniques  I though were relatively straightforward, like paper mache, are in fact quite complicated, if you want to get  good results. Learning them properly, through making mistakes and trying different things can be a lengthily process that is not necessarily particularly interesting for the by-stander. The bystander is not the only one with a problem with this. Along with the things that have a long process to them, I would like to be making quick, light, fun stuff – transformation of objects that need less of a technical skill than the ability to see things differently and redesign them to fit their new designation.

I decided to make a list of thing that I need and want around the house, and within the next year, I will try to make as many of them as possible. The list is quite varied, and so will the work be. All the while, in the background, I will continue to investigate techniques that are more painstaking to learn.

 My list (drumrollllll)

1. Hooks and hangers:

 Coat hangers for guest

 Coat hooks for the laundry room (It’s a bit like hold all room)

Towel rack/hooks for the master bathroom

Hooks in the kids play room.

 2. Light fittings for the entire house. That would make it about 20 since we have some        rooms with more than one.

 3.   Shelving for my tiny, tiny studio.

 4.   Refurnish Study.

 5.   Garden furniture.

 6.   Garden gate.

 7.   Coffee table/s.

 8.   Carpet for the living room.

 9.   Carpet for the hall.

 10. Carpet for the kids room.

 11.  Art :-).

 12.   Storage containers/baskets for the studio.

 13.   Storage container/baskets for the living room.

14.    Lost socks contraption/basket.

 15.   Bed for our daughter (I found a fantastic bed, or part of a bed on the pavement   I need to make the rest of it and of course make it ours!)

16.   Make the toddler’s bed into a day couch for the play room.

17.   Stencil wall in master bedroom. ( I know that this isn’t strictly connected, but I  have been looking for an excuse to stencil for a while now).

18.    New dinning table (I would love to upcycle our wooden fence from the back yard, which I hate, into a dining table. Ambitious, I know).

 I will be back to this list, to cross out items that I get done. I would love to finish them all in the coming year, but am not holding my breath.  If nothing else, this will keep me focused.